Log Entries: 12/31/2015 (Part 1)

AS THE YEAR 2015 HAS UNFOLDED, and the world has turned, I have neglected to properly pay respect to the loss of many notable, talented people, who contributed in the genres of science fiction and fantasy.  This is primarily because there have been so many notable individuals to pass away, over the previous year.  And as a result, I now find myself backed-up with a looooong list, that truly needs to be addressed.  Therefore, out of respect for these talented entertainers, I present Part 1 of a special 2-part blog post. 

May they live forever among the stars and the many realms of the fantastic … Grace 2LADIES FIRST … TWO ALUMNI OF THE ORIGINAL STAR TREK have passed away.  The First, Grace Lee Whitney, played Janice Rand from the 1960’s to the 1990’s.  But she began her career in entertainment in her teens, as a singer on a Detroit radio show, thereafter moving on to Chicago and opening for Billie Holiday, and later touring with bandleader Spike Jones.  Controlled ExperimentEventually, she found her way to Broadway, and stared in the show, Top Banana; reprising her role in the movie adaptation.  Moving to L.A., she had scenes with Jack Lemon in Some Like it Hot, and uncredited roles in House of Wax and Pocketful of Miracles.  And segueing into Television, she secured memorable roles in The Outer Limits, and westerns like The Virginian and The Rifleman.  In time, Gene Roddenberry would cast her in roles in The Lieutenant and Police Story.  And that led to him casting her in the role of Janice Rand for the first season of Star TrekGrace Lee Whitney Star Trek Pilot promoAccording to Roddenberry, her character was designed to be a nod to Miss Moneypenny in the Bond films.  Other more contemporary comparisons would be the David Addison & Maddy Hayes relationship, as seen on Moonlighting, and the Fox Mulder & Dana Skully relationship, as seen on The X-Files.  Her character, Yeoman Janice Rand, and Captain James Kirk would be attracted to one another, but never actually act on those feelings.  And although it was her character in photographs that was used to promote the show before it initially aired, Whitney was eventually let go after only a handful of episodes, and her character was gone from the original series show, for good.  Her ex-boyfriend Harlan Ellison attempted to get her back on the show by writing her character into his teleplay for City on the Edge of Forever, but it didn’t gel with Rodennberry, or NBC.  Rand stayed gone.  She was given the explanation that there was no room for her character.  The ‘too many blondes on the show’ excuse.  “They didn’t want to give the fans the idea he (Kirk) was in love with Janice Rand. That would limit him. They wanted him to go out and fool around. So, I was axed.”  Whitney commented.  But her firing had also followed on the heels of her having been sexually assaulted by an executive, who had some presence on the show.  And the show was also having budget problems, and needed to cut costs.  Whitney herself later offered that an another possible explanation may have been her drinking, and her addiction to amphetamines; which she was taking to keep her weight down so she could fit into Rand’s tight uniform.Grace TMP In 1976, DeForest Kelley, having felt bad that his character became more popular than hers (which was not intended,) and that he had essentially swallowed up her salary with a pay increase, spotted her on the employment line in Los Angeles, and advised her that fans had been asking for her at conventions.  She seized the opportunity, and her character was eventually included by Roddenberry in the development of a new Star Trek show, subtitled, Phase II.  When that fizzled out, she was brought aboard Star Trek: The Motion Picture to reprise the role of Janice Rand, who was no longer a ‘Yeoman’ in Starfleet, but now a ‘Chief Petty Officer.’  She again played Rand (this time a mere cameo role,) in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock.  Not RandSporting new red locks, Janice Rand shakes her head at the damage done to the Enterprise (re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan) from a Spacedock observation lounge.  Apparently, Director Leonard Nimoy intended this to be seen as ‘another’ character, and not Rand.  But fans had other ideas.  Nimoy later invited her to return for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.  This appearance made Rand, like Christine Chapel, somewhat more of a utility to the plot.  The position of ‘Communications Officer’ gave her character more of a presence than she had had in the previous film, and her role and dialogue were more ‘plot-centric,’ and therefore, memorable.  Grace 3Her next appearance in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country found her functioning as a ‘Lieutenant Commander’ aboard the Excelsior, for Captain Sulu.  A role and function she repeated for an episode of Star Trek: Voyager, titled ‘Flashback.’  Whitney’s son stated to the media that she wanted to be known more as a survivor of addiction than as a cast member of Star Trek, but Janice Rand’s gonna be hard to forget.  She died in her home on May 1st.  She was 85 years old.Grace 4THE SECOND STAR TREK ALUM, ARLENE GRETA SAX (MARTEL,) was born in The Bronx in 1936.  As a teen she attended the Performing Arts High School, in New York, and later studied at The Actors Studio.  Arlene DemonMoving to L.A., and residing on ‘Martel Ave.’ in West Hollywood, she took the street name as her stage name, and soon got roles on Perry Mason, Have Gun Will Travel, Bewitched, Hogan’s Heroes, I Dream of Jeannie, The Fugitive, Twilight Zone, Mission: Impossible, The Wild Wild West, The Monkees, The Outler Limits (Demon With a Glass Hand,) The Six Million Dollar Man, Columbo, The Rockford Files, and Battlestar Galactica.  But it was Star Trek that left her with a permanent imprint in pop-culture.  Season 2’s, ‘Amok Time,’ was an episode written by noted science fiction author Theodore (Ted) Sturgeon.  And it is considered one of the best of the entire series.  Arlene STIn it, Spock convinces Captain Kirk to return to his home world of Vulcan for a mating ritual, that his race requires to maintain sanity.  After beaming down, he is faced with his intended bride, T’Pring, played by Martel — and suddenly, things get complicated.  Once Star Trek conventions became a thing, Martel became a regular, and never stopped making the occasional appearance.  Right up to her death from a heart attack in August of last year, in Santa Monica, California.  Martel was not only an actor, but also an author, and reportedly lifelong friends with the likes of Anthony Quinn and Sidney Lumet — and dated both James Dean and Carey Grant.  She worked hard and had adventures here and there.  Arlene Martel was 78 years old.  Rest well, and in peace, T’Pring.Arlene 1PETER (NIGEL) TERRY was reportedly the first baby born in Bristol, England, following the end of the Second World War.  Nigel 2He developed an interest in acting, drawing, and painting, while in grade school, and eventually joined the National Youth Theater.  In the early 60’s, he attended London’s Central School of Speech and Drama, and later joined the Oxford Meadow Players.  Mostly a stage actor, he made a handful of film and TV appearances, including: The Lion in Winter, Doctor Who, Highlander: The Series, Troy, and most notably … he played King Arthur in John Boorman’s Excalibur, in 1981.  He passed away from emphysema in April.  He was 69. Nigel Terry as King Arthur in the 1981 film Excalibur.YOU KNOW WHO RICHARD DYSART IS.  You may not know that you know — Nope, don’t argue.  If you see a photo of him, you will hear his voice, and that voice will say, ‘Mac!‘  That’s right, he’s that guy from John Carpenter’s The Thing: ‘Copper.’  DysartDysart was born in Boston in 1929, and attended Gould Academy in Maine, before serving four years in the Air Force during the Korean War.  Arriving in Los Angeles in the early 1960’s, he made many film and television appearances.  The mere mention of many of them brings his face and particularly, his voice, into your immediate memory.  Meteor, Pale Rider, The Terminal Man, Warning Sign, Wall Street, Hard Rain, Mask, The Hospital, The Hindenburg, Back to the Future Part III,  Batman: The Animated Series, L.A. Law … but specifically, John C’s The Thing (From Another World.)Dysart 2Sometimes you just wish you could thank these people in person for all the work they do that entertains you.  Thespian Richard Dysart died at his home in Santa Monica, in April, following a long illness.  He was 86 years old … AND GEOFFREY LEWIS IS ANOTHER STRONG ACTOR we lost recently.  Geoff 2A favorite of director Clint Eastwood, Geoffrey Bond Lewis was born in 1935, in Plainfield, New Jersey.  You will recognize him from Dillinger, High Plains Drifter, Every Which Way But Loose, Salem’s Lot, Bronco Billy, Night of the Comet, Fletch Lives, Tango & Cash, etc., etc., etc. Clint Eastwood offered the following condolence: “I was very saddened by the news of Geoffrey’s passing.  I worked with him on many films and thought he was a wonderful actor and terrific performer. He had the most expressive face—which made working with him so fun. Geoffrey will be greatly missed.”  Lewis was also a father of 10, count ’em, TEN !  With actress Juliette Lewis, being his most well known off-spring.  He was a terrific actor who died in April, at his home in Woodland Hills, California.  Probably with a smile on his face.  Whenever fans recognized him, he always smiled.  I can testify to that.  Geoff was 79.Geoff 1AND SADLY, LOUIS JOURDAN HAS ALSO passed away.  Born Louis Robert Gendre in Marseille, France, in 1921, Jourdan’s family moved to Cannes in 1931, and there he learned English by communicating with the tourists.  He fell into acting at the age of fifteen, and began performing in Paris, just before the Second World War.  Soon after, the Germans had him digging ditches, and he was ordered to cooperate and act in German propaganda films.  He refused, and joined the French Resistance, instead.  Jourdan the Paradine CaseAfter the War ended, Jourdan was spotted by Producer David O. Selznick in a French film, and was put under contract, immediately.  His first American film was Alfred Hitchcock’s The Paradine Case.  His looks led to him often being cast as a leading man, and as a direct result, he was routinely confused with the characters he portrayed.  Said Jourdan, “People look at me, as if I were a naughty weekend.”  In fact, nothing could be farther from the truth.  Jourdan was an introvert by nature, and remained happily married for fifty years.  Swamp ThingHe also loved classical music.  Said Jourdan, “I need music every day.  If I could not act any more I should be unhappy, but I would survive.  I could not go on, though, without music.  It is more important to me than work.”  Jourdan was top-billed in a number of American and UK releases in the 1950’s and 60’s, before finding his way to Broadway and the London Stage, and then American Television and the BBC.  He had a long resume, filled with work from France, the UK, and the U.S.  Jourdan OctopussySome of his more notable performances to American viewers, include: Letter From an Unknown Woman, Gigi, Columbo (Murder Under Glass,) Swamp Thing, and the Roger Moore James Bond outing, Octopussy.  A versatile actor, Jourdan is one of the only entertainers to ever have two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  He died as his home in Beverly Hills, in February.  He was 93.Jourdan 4EDWARD HERRMANN was an actor’s actor.  Herrmann 3He did comedy, he did drama, he did narration, he did it all.  And he never stopped working, bouncing from theater to screen, and genre to genre.  And throughout it all, he maintained his creative integrity.  Edward Kirk Herrmann was born in July of 1943. He grew up in Michigan, attending Bucknell University, before transferring to the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, on a Fellowship.  His career began in theater in the early 1970’s, and segued into film and television in the late 70’s.  Herrmann 2He played a law student in James Bridges’, The Paper Chase, Roosevelt in two TV movies, Herman Munster in a made-for-TV film, and made appearances in The Great Waldo Pepper and The Great Gatsby (both with Robert Redford,) an episode of M.A.S.H., The Betsy, Warren Beatty’s Reds, the Kurt Russel/Goldie Hawn comedy, Overboard, a made-for-TV version of Ray Bradbury’s The Electric Grandmother, Woody Allen’s The Purple Rose of Cairo, The Man With One Red Shoe, Nixon, The Practice, Law & Order, RKO 281, Grey’s Anatomy, 30 Rock, and The History Channel show, Automobiles.  He passed away in December of last year, while hospitalized at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  The head vampire from the 80’s pop-culture classic, The Lost Boys, was 71 years old.Herrmann 1 ANOTHER STAR TREK ALUM, JOSEPH SARGENT worked best as a journeyman director.  He was one of the best, in fact.  ColossusBorn in 1925 as Giuseppe Danielle Sorgente, in New Jersey, Sargent fought during the Battle of the Bulge, in World War II.  Returning, he attended The Actors Studio, wishing to become an actor.  Unfortunately, he only garnered roles as a basic background extra.  But somehow, he managed to break into directing in the 50’s, and garnered credits such as Lassie, Gunsmoke, The Fugitive, Kojak, The Invaders, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., and Star Trek (The Corbomite Maneuver.)  His breakthrough as a film director, however, came with helming the classic, Colossus: The Forbin Project.  And from there, he went on to take credits directing films such as The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (a project developed by Steven Spielberg,) White Lighting (another project that began as a Steven Spielberg film,) the Nicholas Meyer written TV film, The Night that Panicked America (based on Orson Welles’ infamous ‘War of the Worlds’ radio broadcast,) the 1985 TV miniseries, Space, MacArthur, and Miss Evers Boys.  CorbomiteHe was nominated several times for his work in television, and won for 1973’s, The Marcus-Nelson Murders.  J. SargentAnd eventually, he was nominated, and won the Director’s Guild of America’s Outstanding Directorial Achievement award, twice.  First in 2005, for Something the Lord Made, and again in 2006 for Warm Springs.  And when he retired in 2010, he accepted an appointment as the Senior Filmmaker-in-Residence for the Directing program at the A.F.I. Conservatory in L.A.  Taking into account the best of the above mentioned achievements, we will forgive him for Jaws: The Revenge.  He died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his home in Malibu, in December of last year.  He was 89 … ROBERT KINOSHITA IS NOT A NAME MANY WILL KNOW.  However, if you are sci-fi film and TV savvy — and I tell you he was the primary designer of ‘Robby’ in the film Forbidden Planet, and later, ‘Robot’ from the 1960’s TV show, Lost in Space — I bet I have your attention.  Robert 1Kinoshita was born in 1914 in L.A., and studied architecture as USC.  While there, he saw an exhibit of work by school alumni who were working for the movie studios.  And he knew instantly that’s what he wanted to do.  But with the outbreak of WWII, Kinoshita and his new wife were interned in a Japanese prisoner of war camp, in Arizona.  After the War, the designer spent several years studying further, and honing his talent for just the job he wanted.  And he got it.  Now, it should be stated that Kinoshita didn’t build ‘Robby the Robot’ all by himself.  In fact, he had a team of professionals working to construct his most famous creation.  But the design was Kinoshita’s.  F.P.At the time, he was head draftsman at the MGM art department, and had his whole department generating drawings and general designs on behalf of the film’s art director.  But according to Kinoshita himself, he upped the bar on his own behalf.  “We had five guys designing, and we just knocked out, must have been a couple thousand drawings.  So I said, ‘The hell with it, I’m going to make me a model.'”  Little did he know then …   In 1965, Irwin Allen hired him to be the overall art director for his show, Lost in SpaceLost in SpaceHe designed the ship’s ‘Robot.’ (Based almost entirely on his earlier design for ‘Robby.‘)  And that creation, now well-known for uttering the phrase, “Danger, Will Robinson !  Danger !” wasn’t his only noteworthy design on Lost in Space.  He also designed the ‘Jupiter 2’ spacecraft, along with a whole host of other sets and accoutrements, along the show’s multiple season path.  He was also art director on Highway Patrol, Bat Masterson, Science Fiction Theater, Men Into Space, Sea Hunt, Hawaii Five-O, and Kojak.  And in 1961, he contributed to the design of the film The Phantom Planet.  In 2004, Kinoshita was inducted into the Robot Hall of Fame by the Carnegie-Mellon Institute.  He died last December at the age of 100.  Poet George Herbert said living well is the best revenge.  Looks like Mr. Kinoshita exemplified that statement.Robert KinoshitaWHENEVER ANY TRUE SCIENCE-FICTION FAN THINKS OF ROD TAYLOR, they think of one specific film.  George Pal’s production of H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine.  The Time MachineRodney Sturt (Rod) Taylor was born in a suburb of Sydney, Australia, in 1930.  This surprises many people.  Especially since his accent never betrayed an Australian tongue.  And for most of his career, his Australian accent was nowhere to be heard.  Twilight ZoneIn fact, many of his friends and colleagues have reported that he simply lost it.  (His first performance as an Australian, would come along in 1963, acting alongside Louis Jourdan, in The V.I.P.’s.)  In fact, Taylor did a volume of work in Australian theater and radio, before he really broke into show business, in Hollywood.  He made his official film debut in King of the Coral Sea, in 1954, and played Israel Hands in a sequel to Disney’s Treasure Island, called Long John Silver.  Soon after, Taylor was on TV in the States, racking up roles, and preparing for his career in film.  GiantStrong supporting roles in various television shows and films (including a part in Raintree County, another in Giant, and a showstopping performance in an episode of the Twilight Zone,) led to his debut as a lead, in features.  The film The Time Machine was a huge hit, and ‘Rod Taylor’ quickly became one of those ‘household name’ actors, that everybody hears about, regardless of whether they watch movies, or not.  He segued into a variety of roles, including playing opposite Doris Day in The Glass Bottom Boat, voicing a character in Disney’s One Hundred and One Dalmations, and thereafter found himself working with Alfred Hitchcock on the classic suspense film, The Birds.The Birds  In the early 1970’s, he was reportedly up for a role opposite Bruce Lee in Enter the Dragon.  But his height was taken into consideration, and suddenly he had lost the role to actor John Savage.  As time passed, Taylor amassed a longer list of television and film appearances, including The Train Robbers with John Wayne, and Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point.  The great Rod Taylor ended his career with a sly and very successful cameo as Winston Churchill, in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious BastardsRod Taylor as ChurchillThe Time Traveler suffered a fatal heart attack in January, only days away from his 85th birthday.  Here’s to you, Mr. Taylor !  May your travels continue Rod 1

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART 2 …

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REVIEW: Star Wars: The Force Awakens

“STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS” SPOILERS AHEAD!! ALL SPOILERS!!
SERIOUSLY, DO NOT READ IF YOU HAVE NOT SEEN THE MOVIE!! YOU HAVE NO EXCUSES!!  ALSO: FAIR WARNING — FOUL LANGUAGE AHEAD.  THIS IS AN UNCENSORED REVIEW!!! 

**Please NOTE: I began writing a movie review, and wound up writing a paper. A thesis, if you will, that critiques the film Star Wars: The Force Awakens, but moreover subsists as a tome of frustration against, and will hopefully be thumbtacked to the very ass of, Corporate Hollywood.

IN PROLOGUE  A Writer in Requiem

In May of 1983, I was 12 years old.

Sitting in a darkened theater called “Angelina Twin Cinema,” in Lufkin, Texas, I watched as the last (and most anticipated) of the original Star Wars Trilogy, unfolded. And surprisingly, I sank lower, and lower, and lower in my seat. Having read interviews with various behind-the-scenes participants, in various movie magazines such as Starlog and Fantastic Films, I knew in advance that something hadn’t gone quite as planned in relation to the film’s screenplay. On my way in, I really didn’t think it would matter. On my way out, I was frustrated. I just kept shaking my head, ‘Why the hell did they do that??’

While watching the movie, my ability to delude myself, suspend my disbelief, and in general distract myself from the film’s faults, was not only nonexistent, it had gradually turned into full blown anxiety. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. Five drafts! All circulated among V.I.P.’s termed, “Above-The-Line Talent,” prior to principal photography. And with each new draft, reportedly came even more watered down characters and plot developments, and more and more contrived and inconsequential visual exposition. Rumor was, it was a ploy intended to sell more toys.

I was caught off guard. I could actually see the difference in the quality of the material, moving across the screen. And I could certainly hear it in the dialogue. Although the larger structure was really strong, scenes within that larger story structure were … simplified. And a little wooden. Even cartoony. But more often, pointless. This was awkward and embarrassing. Especially in comparison with the former film, Empire Strikes Back. Within two days, I knew I could have written it better. I didn’t just think I could have written Return of the Jedi better – I knew I could have written it better. This was the very moment, I realized I was going to be a writer. Whether I wanted to be, or not.

Mind you, I was only 12 years old.

.....and not a single Yub Nub was given that day.

…..and not a single Yub Nub was given that day.

PART FIRST  The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing or Wherein I explain the how’s and why’s of every nightmare in the 21’st Century being systematically generated and monopolized by Opportunists

I thought Return of the Jedi was the worst Star Wars would ever have to offer.  DISSOLVE TO: Thirty-two years and Seven months have passed since then. And Luke Skywalker has vanished. In more than one sense.

After a disappointing trilogy of Prequel films, helmed by original Star Wars co-writer and director, George Lucas, Disney and Lucasfilm sought out talent to “reboot” their newly acquired franchise. Several names were thrown to the media. After months of gossip, former movie Producer, and newly inaugurated Lucasfilm President, Kathleen Kennedy announced that J.J. Abrams had gotten the job.

Abrams entered the Industry as a college film school grad who had attracted the attention of the one and only Steven Spielberg. Working in multiple roles and positions in the area of film production, “Jeffrey” Abrams had managed to write and sell screenplays such as: Taking Care of Business (1990,) Regarding Henry (1991,) and Forever Young (1992.) Eventually, he was offered work polishing scripts for film production, and did so for good payment, but little or no credit. That is, with exception to the 1998 stupidfest, Armageddon. And just why Abrams would agree to a job rewriting said script is a head-scratcher. Specifically in light of the fact that Steven Spielberg was a mentor to Abrams, and Armageddon was competing against the Steve Spielberg produced Deep Impact.

Segueing into the TV business, by writing, and creating shows such as Felicty and Alias, Abrams quickly became a well-known, successful commodity in the business of Television. By the time the TV show Lost became a phenomenon in 2004, Abrams had plopped into the Television Development Executive comfy chair, offering comments, notes, and a certain creative advice, on numerous shows. A job role which he would never be credited with, as Development Executives rarely get credited. That’s the job position they don’t want you asking too many questions about. Because Television Development Executives always have more authority than they really need, and exploit it, obsessive-compulsively.

Eventually, Abrams began directing. First in Television, but later with films like Mission: Impossible III, Super8 (a film that reportedly pitted him against both Dreamworks’ and Paramount’s Development Executives, with heartbreaking results, ha-ha) and two Star Trek films. And all the while, he maintained his role as a “Television Development Executive.” The role that actually introduced him to the corporate climate of Hollywood, and in effect, has always been his trump card in the industry.

So, why did Lucasfilm want Abrams? Because Stephen Spielberg called up Kathy Kennedy and suggested Abrams. And why would Stephen Spielberg call up Kathy Kennedy, wishing to suggest Abrams? Because Spielberg had discovered that Disney (which owns Lucasfilm) wanted to reboot Star Wars into another kind of franchise. And just what kind of franchise? An ATM Machine, that’s what kind of franchise. Specifically, an overly episodic, simplified, addicting storyline. An unending series of films, preferably designed with less emphasis on the Joseph Campbell influence, and preferably straight-jacketed by a “Bible.” A “Bible” on a show, is television industry parlance for, “We wanna know what the hell’s gonna happen, going forward; don’t hold anything back; tell us everything, so that we — those who are really in charge — can determine the direction of these stories. You know, just like the Marvel films that we release. That’s it! Simplify the fuck out of it, in advance; that works for us!” They wanted something that they, the corporate-minded people who don’t really want to watch these movies, can understand. Something that is nothing like the Original Trilogy. Something that Development Executives can understand. Something like a Television Pilot…

Enter, J.J. Abrams.

PART SECOND  “The Film,” if you insist upon calling it that, or Jar Jar Abrams Strikes Again

There will always be quibbles. So let’s get those out of the way, first. I have two minor quibbles about the opening of this new film, The Farce Awakens, and I’ll let it be that. Laugh if you wish, I’m sure you will.

A) “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away …” was always vibrant blue in the Original films. Now, for some inexplicable reason, it’s freakin’ green. And kind of an ugly green.

B) That opening starfield doesn’t look right. Many of the stars seem to be in the same place as they are in the other films, but … Now, I know you’re laughing, but I’m tellin’ ‘ya, it doesn’t look right. All the stars are the exact same brightness, giving it absolutely no depth at all. It looks cheaper. In the Original films, the starfields have depth. Mainly because the effects artists gave them depth, by creating multiple layers of variant brightness. In the case of this new film, it appears that a computer program mapped out the generic starfield from the Original films, and re-generated it. And no one ever sought to even tweak that. They just let the computer do it. You wouldn’t think this would matter, but it does.SW a long time ago

Let’s get back to those quibbles a little later. Presently, let me just give you the overlong, exasperated, overblown, blow-by-bow, description of incidentals that take place within this movie, minus the commercial breaks. *dusts hands* Stay tuned, I’m about to get mean.

The camera tilts down to the planet Jakku (pronounced Jack-oooo,) and after Abrams’ poor attempt at a signature opening shot (a cartoony shadowy triangle of a big star destroyer rising up in frame to cover the day-side of the planet,) we are on planet night-side. And quickly introduced to an apparently nameless character, played by world-renowned actor, Max Von Sydow. But please don’t get to comfortable with him, or curious about him, because he will be dead shortly. After having a brief exchange with Poe Dameron (played well by actor Oscar Isaac of Inside Llewyn Davis,) this makeshift camp in the desert is raided by Stormtroopers. Wait. Are they still called Stormtroopers? Screw it, I’m callin’ ‘em Stormtroopers. Poe has uttered exposition, confirming that he is part of ‘The Resistance’ (this is apparently a new word standing in for Rebellion; when in fact the Rebellion apparently never ended, and both words mean the same damn thing,) and Sydow has given him a small thumb drive (no shit, that’s exactly what it is) filled with some secret data that will assist the Rebels. I mean the Resisters. Whatever.

So the camp is attacked — and although brief, it is good action filmmaking; some nice work here – and we are introduced to BB8, which is Poe’s droid. Poe’s X-Wing fighter is damaged during the melee, so he cannot escape the Raid with the thumb drive. So he puts it in the robot, and tells BB8 to take off, that he will catch up with the cute little spanner later. Then, Poe sees an Imperial ship approach and land. Meanwhile, one of the Stormtroopers sees a comrade killed, and runs to his aid, only getting there as a bloody hand reaches up to mark his helmet. Then, the same sympathetic Stormtrooper watches as his other comrades gun down unarmed people. And even though he’s wearing a helmet, Stormtrooper is clearly conflicted. THIS guy, is the absolute best, and most wonderful thing about this fucking movie.

Soon after, a dark and shady guy in cheap black cloth and a graphite grilled helmet comes out to question Max Von Sydow. They seem to know each other. Sydow speaks to Mr. dark and shady, says something about you can hide behind a mask, and call yourself Kylo Ren, but yada yada yada… That sort of thing. So Kylo Ren lightsabers Max Von Sydow. A wonderful thespian, and unique talent, taken from the Star Wars universe so quickly it makes you want to buy a puppy, name it J.J. Abrams, and slap the living shit out of it. Then, some Stormtroopers bring Poe before the Kylo Ren person, and place him on his knees. Kylo Ren leans over, just stares at Poe. Poe comments that he’s not sure if he’s supposed to talk first. Then Kylo says something about wanting the little thumb drive, and Poe comments that he can’t understand a word he’s saying; must be the mask. They take Poe away. Stormtrooper with blood on helmet is still conflicted …

Shift to day, and across the Planet. A character we eventually come to know as ‘Rey,’ a teenage scavenger, appears, and following a series of expository bits of business revealing her shit life and knowledge of the veritable junkyard of ‘Empire’ space ships littering the planet, she rescues the nauseously cute BB8 from a junk scavenger, who would have simply dismantled the robot for spare parts. This comes to us via conversation between Rey the teenager, and BB8 the droid. You see, she speaks his language. They can communicate. Something Luke needed an X-Wing Fighter’s computer to assist him with in Empire Strikes Back. Wait, it gets better. As the movie goes on, she talks to Chewie, as well. She’d make a great protocol droid, given she speaks the language of everybody she meets. In any case, she shows dignity and integrity, by refusing to sell BB8 for food. Awwwww …

Meanwhile, after arriving on-board the Star Destroyer, Conflicted Stormtrooper needs a moment to himself. After removing his helmet to get some air, he finds a minor character named “Captain Phasma” over his shoulder. A sleek, tall, chrome Stormtrooper that looks very similar to a Cylon on the old Battlestar Galactica. By Phasma’s voice, we know the dude’s a she. This cool chick was wasted. She pops up infrequently, and only for an instant. And Later on in the movie, they just stick her in a garbage compactor, and that’s the last we see of her. And we never saw much of her to begin with, mind you. I hear she’s in the sequel. Lame excuse.

Anyway, after Poe has been interrogated by Kylo Ren, or Darth Punk-ass Bitch, as I like to call him, Conflicted Stormtrooper is placed in charge of the despot Rebel fighter, and pulls them both aside to offer to help Poe escape, if Poe will fly. Because conflicted Stormtrooper’s not a pilot. Some funny exposition, and the two of them go through a humorous sequence of stealing a Tie Fighter and crash landing it back on Jakku. But before they do, Conflicted Stormtrooper gives his name as FN and a number. Poe refuses to call him that, decides to call him “FINN.” Finn responds really enthusiastically to this. They probably should have rethought that moment, given what a white man giving a black man a name, implies.

They two are separated by the crash. Is Poe no more? Finn meets Rey, after witnessing her defend herself. Gets attacked by Rey because BB8 recognizes Poe’s jacket on Finn. Somewhere in there, Finn lies, says he’s part of the Resistance. And essentially he is, now. Whether he likes it or not. So technically, he’s not really lying. And, the Empire – I mean The First Order – Jesus, was it really necessary that they rename the fucking Empire? Okay. I’ll just have to get used to that, I guess. I’m not getting used to ‘The Resistance,’ though. That is ‘The Ridiculous.’ So anyway, The F.O. knows that BB8 is carrying the thumb drive. So they’re gonna be looking for it, right? And the last thing they would do is shoot at it, right? Wrong. Sort of a plot hole, there, people! Once they find BB8, Tie Fighters show up and start strafing the area. Clearly attempting to murder the poor little robot fart. Like I said, PLOT HOLE, PEOPLE! Or … ‘ya know, discrepancy, or whatever-the-hell you wanna call it. I don’t care.  Run, you little 1981 Nerf soccer ball.BB-8So Rey and Finn have to escape. But like Gerbils, they’re obviously going nowhere without transportation off this rock. So she leads them to a ship that’s about 200 yards away. Finn sees one closer, and shouts something along the lines of, “What about that one!?” She looks across the desert sand, and deems it to be a piece of junk. Suddenly, the very ship they’re running for 200 yards away gets blasted into oblivion, and Rey and Finn deviate to ‘piece of junk.’ Which turns out to be The Millennium Falcon, with tattered tarp covering its fuselage. IT’S A TARP! Admiral Ackbar even makes a later appearance in the movie. So this is a nice little in-joke.

Contrivance, contrivance, they escape, get caught by a freighter, which turns out to be Han Solo and Chewie, wherein we get the famous trailer moment, “Chewie … we’re home,” but a slightly better version of it. Once everyone knows who everyone is, Han tells Chewie that they will have to let the kids off at a nearby way station. Rey and Finn offer that BB8 is carrying a map to Luke Skywalker. Han is surprised. They take a look at it. The map is not complete, but it’s a good chance for some exposition. Han tells them that Luke tried to train a new generation of Jedi, and failed, miserably. He sunk into depression and vanished. Leia has been trying to find him ever since. Han says at one time he didn’t believe any of it: a force that encompassed everything, the Jedi, their powers. All of it. But now, he tells them he knows it’s true. All of it. This scene attempts to get across that these kids have heard about ‘The Force,’ and these people (Han, Luke, etc.) but assumed they were mythical. And now they’re finding out they are real. Unfortunately, it’s handled, fleetingly, and amateurishly. And after illustrating that little bit of the scene from the trailer, ‘It’s all true, all of it,’ the scene essentially goes nowhere. They really didn’t know what they had there.  I honestly thought, given that this is a key scene, that the filmmakers would have worked on it a bit longer. But oh, no, it seems like they did a couple of passes, and never came back to it, and consequently, the real meaning of it, and the opportunity to dig deeper and have it really mean something, and possibly narrow down the through-line of the entire movie, gets lost. Or is slighted. Don’t get me wrong. You comprehend what they’re telling you — the idea they’re trying to get across — but it’s not nearly as mythical or emotional or legendary as it should be. Most important scene in the movie, and they mucked it up. And they could’a done it with less dialogue. That’s the sad part. And there’s something bothering me about Han Solo. He seems familiar. But like a grandmother.  Please note: I did not say grandfather.

Next, there’s a mindlessly unnecessary sequence that follows wherein two criminal gangs dock with and board Han and Chewie’s freighter, wanting the return of their money, as cargo was undelivered. Han argues he’s got to get rid of the cargo he currently has, before he can pay them back. Seems Han is borrowing from Peter to pay Paul, again. Han’s hauling some monsters, which I cannot remember the name of, but wasn’t really impressed by much. They certainly were creepy, gooey looking things; I’ll give ‘em that. Weird looking 1990’s Sci-Fi shit, is really what it was. However, they were derivative, and not very inventive. Didn’t capture my imagination for an instant. Matter of fact, looked like a rejected creature from one of Abrams’ Star Trek films. Or any bad sci-fi movie, for that matter.

Anyway, our heroes escape in the Falcon and travel to another planet to meet a small alien woman who owns a Bar in a Castle. A small alien woman who wants to know where her boyfriend Chewbacca is. Anyway. There’s some talk at a table. Finn warns them about a new type of Deathstar. Finn wants to get the hell out of there, and head for the Galaxy’s outer rim, for safety. Rey is shocked. Finn decides to leave with some aliens who will take him there. The Bar owner, Maz Kenyata? Kanata? Sounds like a compact car. I guess it is hard for Development Executives to come up with good names in the Star Wars Universe. She asks Han who the girl is, WE CUT AWAY before he answers. But we suspect that we will eventually learn in another film, that this is Luke Skywalker’s daughter. Maybe, maybe not. Perhaps they haven’t nailed that down yet. I don’t know whether to chastise them for generating a Bible for this new enterprise, or chastise them for not having figured out the backstory to their own fucking movie. I’m conflicted.

Case in point. Rey hears something, and is drawn into the basement of Castle/Bar. Down a long stone hallway, she finds a keepsake box with a lightsaber inside. Touching it, she has a flashback to the corridor aboard Cloud City, from Empire Strikes Back, sees Kylo Ren and others like him, and finally, sees herself as a little girl, abandoned on Jakku. Apparently, by her parents. At this point, I realize that the planet Jakku is not really very interesting, and has come up far too much, and been dwelled on far too much, in this movie. It looks exact’a’fuckin’ like Tantooine. So why didn’t they just – never mind. So the little Maz Piñata Bar owner lady appears, again, tells Rey that the lightsaber belonged to Luke, how it got here is another story, but that it calls to Rey. Rey runs away, says she never wants to touch the thing again. Like a virgin. The point that should be taken, though, is that none of this makes sense, because it doesn’t make sense to Abrams, either. Keep that in mind.

By the way, there are a few brief interludes I’m leaving out between a red-headed guy in authority aboard the Star Destroyer, and Mr. shady, Kylo Ren. They are wasted time. I have also left out a character seen in giant hologram. A shitty hologram. Named Snoke. It looks like a giant naked “Dobby” from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Only without ears. Snoke wants Kylo Ren to kill his father, Han Solo. Stupid for them to give that away so early, but whatever, dude. Your story; ruin it if ‘ya gotta. Snoke is the kind of character you hope somehow vanishes in-between movies. He’s gonna turn out to be the Jar Jar of these new films, I can see that already.

So, two aliens inside the Bar/Castle have sent secret messages: one to the Rebel Alliance (once again, the ‘Resistance.’ Notice how my mind is ‘Resisting’ using that word,) the other to The Fuck Off. I mean the F.O. Both report that they’ve found the droid each side is looking for. Which is not a bad bit of business, but not handled very effectively. If I could take a moment to simply reiterate my appreciation for the fact that F.O. also stands for – never mind that; never mind that. Okay … so Rey has run off into the woods around the Castle/Bar place, and looks up to see Tie Fighters, etc., flying overhead. Uh, oh. Shit’s about to get real. Right? Not so fast, this is a sequence that could have been done much better. It’s too much ‘by the numbers.’ As if the director just walked through it. Like it was a Television Pilot — thaaaat’s right; I forgot, I’m sorry.

Rey is confronted by Finn. I mean Kylo Ren. Sorry. Finn and Ren rhyme too much. That’s not good. Anyway. Rey is still in the woods when Kylo tries to get the location of the droid out of her, and discovers that she’s seen the map. It’s in her head. Which for some reason reminds me of Star Trek. So he places her in an unconscious state, and abducts her. Finn sees this after fighting a Stormtrooper with Luke’s lightsaber. The Stormtrooper, by the by, has been magically equipped – total fucking coincidence, I’m sure – with a wonderful taser wand, that deflects a lightsaber. Let that sink in. So a moment later, Finn sees Kylo Ren taking Rey — ya know all three of their names should have been changed to something else. Rey, Ren, and Finn. What dumbass thought that was a good idea??Candycane Candycane

Okay … so anyway, Finn is sweet on Rey. And is devastated to see her being carried, unconscious into a later-day shuttle craft, by Kylo Ren. He tells Han they took her, and Han just confirms he knows; walking straight for a transport ship, landing not far away. He stands solemn, waiting. Like a guy’s who’s really done something stupid, waiting for his wife to get off the plane at the airport. And you’re expecting a really amped up Leia. Because previous dialogue from Maz the Bar owner has led you to believe that Han and Leia haven’t seen each other in a while. So she’s gonna have a word with him. Right? Wrong. Instead, you get a wooden Carrie Fisher; whose performance as Leia was clearly restricted. And that sucks. Big time. You also get C-3PO. He says hello to Han Solo and makes a small, trivial comment about his new “red” arm. Which seems forced, and truly makes you wonder if this Abrams guy is aware of how discombobulated and awkward that is. Because there’s nothing more to it than that. And why would 3PO need to mention that it’s “red?” Anyway, Han tells Leia that he saw their son. “He was here,” he says this without an ounce of grit, and suddenly I realize what it is that’s been bothering me about Han Solo. He’s been lobotomized.

Another thing I’ve neglected to mention is that Poe Dameron from the opening scenes, finally returns to pilot another X-Wing craft in defense of the aliens and resistance fighters, around the Castle/Bar. No doubt sent by Leia. So Poe’s back. That’s cool.

So now we get a protracted sequence on another planet, somewhere, wherein various characters converge and have more dialogue and exposition, which isn’t really well thought out, but also isn’t as simple and straight to the point as the original Star Wars, either. A shame really. Intercut with this, is Rey aboard the new Death Star. Which is a Death Star with a big laser gun at the equator, but with land and water all over the rest of the planet. Looks like they built this new Star Destroyer base from within the planet. Interesting idea. Wish they had dwelt on that a bit more. Even if only with a bit more dialogue about it. I’ve read they termed this technological craptastic extravaganza, “Starkiller Base.” But I don’t remember hearing that uttered in the movie.

So Rey is restrained within Kylo Ren’s interrogation room (the same one he interrogated Poe in,) and she convinces Kylo to finally take off his helmet. And as suspected, it’s Adam Driver. But we all knew that, because Disney and Lucasfilm can’t keep a secret for shit. They even paraded him out at Comic-Con – alongside the other villains featured in the film. Driver, while earning my respect in spades as both a thespian, and former United States Marine, is nonetheless playing a character that is not genuinely a threat to anyone. It’s easy to understand why they cast him, though. He looks like he could be the bastard child of Han and Leia. Looks a bit, in his own way, like each of them. And I can see what they’re going for here. The concept of the character is that he’s sort of a young 21 year-old guy from one of the X-Men movies, who drifted way past Magneto’s prejudice, and straight into complete madness … because he meant to do that. Kind of creepy, actually. But by his own exhibited behavior, the character is still just a child. And that just doesn’t work within this film. Because he’s the only real heavy, and he ain’t that damn heavy. Maybe if he was more acrobatic, and moved around like lightning. Something, anything scary. I’ve always believed that what makes a fantasy villain work is whether or not you could bean him in the head with a big rock, and he would still kill you. I mean that takes courage on your part. But what if it has no effect on the villain. Then you know you are dealing with something closer to evil. As opposed to a soul you can relate to, and have a dialectic argument with. But, from what I know of Kylo Run, I mean Ren, I could bean his ass in the head from 20 feet away and run like hell, and he would not recover quickly enough to chase me. He’s too weak. I fear no retribution from him.

Anyway, Kylo Ren soon finds that Rey is strong with the force, and he’s not getting that map out of her. So he leaves her under the guard of a Stormtrooper. So she tries the Ben Kenobi, “You don’t need to see his identification. These are not the droids you’re looking for.” And at first, she’s ineffective. It doesn’t work. However, after a second try, it does work. And a Stormtrooper that sounds suspiciously a lot like actor Daniel Craig, frees her, leaves the door open, and walks out, dropping his weapon on the floor. It’s mildly humorous.

So a few of Abrams small potatoes actors make cameos in the Rebels final briefing meeting. And there, of course, is Admiral Ackbar. And across the room, BB8 discovers R2-D2 underneath a drop cloth. C-3PO informs BB8 that when Master Luke went away, R2 went into low power mode, and has been in that state ever since. Maybe that will make more sense in the plot of the next movie. But it would have been nice if it had made sense in THIS movie. But let’s not forget, THIS IS TELEVISION. That’s the way they’ve designed this movie. They’re trying to get you addicted to nonsensical bullshit, with the promise that there will be a payoff. Just like the TV show, Lost. Remember Lost? Yea, that was Abrams.

To wrap things up, Han, Finn and Chewie travel to the big new Deathstar base to complete their part of the sabotage mission. There’s some bit of business about the Empire’s shield’s being at a certain modulation, and therefore the falcon will need to come out of light speed past the shield. Sounds like an idea leftover from Abrams’ Star Trek, but it’s kind’a cool when they do it. And that is when you realize this movie will play better on TV. Once they crash the falcon through some trees, and into some snow, they infiltrate the base, and Finn – who has offered to help them sabotage a vital part of the base – reveals that he lied. He doesn’t know anything about where that that part of the base is, or how to sabotage it. But he wanted to rescue Rey, and he knew they wouldn’t let him come along if he didn’t lie about being a sanitation worker for the F.O. No shit.

So they take Captain Phasma hostage, throw the poor maligned and unused character into a garbage compactor, and find Rey just in time. Now they have to set explosive charges. Whist Han and Chewie are doing this, Han sees Kylo Ren searching for them. Han decides to confront his son, “Ben,” who’s walking across a catwalk platform over a deep chasm leading down into the heart of the base. It does not go well. Kylo “Ben” Ren is definitely conflicted, but his inner conflict exists simply because he’s been ordered to kill his father, Han Solo, by Snoke, the giant earless Dobby clone. And though Kylo Ren/Ben he wants to kill his father, he doesn’t have the gumption. He’s simply not man enough. And Han doesn’t realize that. This reminds me of something Han and Leia had discussed earlier in the hidden Rebel base. Leia says something along the lines of, “If you find our son, bring him home.” But Kylo is no longer Ben. For whatever reason, his psychological transformation from the person he used to be, to the person he now wants to be, is complete. Or it’s about to be. Ben offers his lightsaber to Han, and once Han takes it, Kylo ignites it, right into Han’s chest. Han’s expression is complete surprise. He strokes his son’s cheek, and Kylo further slices the lightsaber blade out of Han’s side, and this sends Han falling into the chasm. Kind of like the Emperor falling into the same type of chasm in Return of the Jedi. Maybe Kylo was always just a bad kid. Maybe he was bullied. Maybe, maybe, maybe; whatever. If they knew, we would know. Abrams and co-writer Lawrence Kasdan never figured that out, so they just never addressed it. Because they don’t have to do that in Television. In light of Harrison Ford terming Return of the Jedi, “… nothing but a big toy commercial,” I’m sure he’s secretly pleased as punch with having shot the most expensive Television Pilot ever made.

So Chewie sees this, HOWLS, and shoots at Kylo. Kylo evades his gunfire, looks up and spots Rey and Finn at an exit on their way out. Rey and Finn run out and into the woods. More woods. Scenes in the woods on two different planets. Interesting. Someone has a one-track mind. Once they get out there, Kylo magically appears from out of nowhere, and uses the Force to slap Rey into a tree. Finn goes to her aid, Kylo gets his attention with, “That lightsaber! It belongs to me.” Clearly Kylo wants Luke’s lightsaber. It is possible, that Luke gave it to him as a boy, and an adult wisely took it away from him. Clearly, Luke tried to train this kid, who, according to dialogue between Han and Leia earlier, was already a bad kid. But they only have a few words about this. So it just puts an image in your head that this kid might have been suffering from a sociopathic personality disorder, before Luke tried to train him in the Jedi arts. So why would Luke blame himself that the kid grew up to be an evil freak, and run away? To be fair, perhaps Luke didn’t run away for that reason. Perhaps Luke ran away because he knew that Kylo Ren could feed off of his power, and become more powerful. And perhaps that’s bullshit.

So Finn fights Kylo, and gets injured badly. We think he’s dead, in fact. Because Kylo Ren sliced him in the back, and we don’t know how deep. So Rey wakes up, sees Fin, and is emotionally overwhelmed. At the end of the previous fight, Luke’s lightsaber went flying off and landed in the snow, several yards away. Kylo uses the Force to grab for it — but it goes right past him and lands in Rey’s hand. And she fights him like she’s been trained. Like a Boss. Plot hole? Perhaps? Or perhaps her memory was wiped by Luke. Or something else. I’ve read theories, but honestly, I don’t think Abrams and Kasdan considered it important enough to determine that. And Rey was a little young in her flashback to when she was abandoned on Jakku. So when they hell did she learn to feel the force and use it, and train with it, and all that stuff??? Another questions we’re not supposed to ask. So she defeats Kylo Ren (sounds like a brand of Ramen Noodle,) leaving him injured, but alive on the other side of a canyon-like chasm that develops between them, following the explosion from the charges left by Han and Chewie. Chewie arrives in the Falcon, helps get Finn aboard, and they leave the planet, with Poe and his Squad in pursuit. The base explodes. Big Bang Boom. And we’re back at the Rebel Base. There is some celebration by the Rebels out on a tarmac. R2-D2 wakes up. He has the rest of the map, and the Rebels put it together with what was on the thumb drive, discovering Luke’s location.

Rey and Leia say goodbye. Rey takes Han’s seat aboard the Falcon. Chewie seems pleased with this. And they take off to cheering. On a distant alien planet, the Falcon surfs across the ocean as they approach an island of grass and rocks. Then, Rey walks from the Falcon, about a half a mile up a series of rock stairs to see a cloaked figure on a cliff, looking out over the ocean. He turns, she takes a step forward. He removes the hood of the cloak (looking a bit too dramatic, and trying to look cool) and she pulls out the lightsaber. Incidentally, I promise you the pose he makes will be turned into an endless series of gifs and memes on the internet. They will appear without hesitation or pause, as soon as that image and/or video is available. Facebook, here it comes. Trust me on this. By the way, Mark Hamill’s clearly wearing hair extensions. But the look on his face, the pain in his eyes … it works because of that. Even though he looks ridiculous.

Next, Rey offers him the lightsaber, and he just stares back at her. He’s a little stunned. Give him a minute, he’s old. Or that’s the impression we’re clearly supposed to get. Self-enforced ageism in Hollywood is getting a tad tired, at this point. “Sure,” they say. “He can be Luke Skywalker. But he has to be Luke Skywalker old and tired and everything that goes with.” Ridiculous. Luke would be more alive than that. Depressed, or not. And to be fair, we have all seen the more recent photos of Mark Hamill on the internet, evidencing his new haircut and waistline. And he’s already in the UK. Rumor is they’ve already started shooting the next movie, even though their official start date for principal photograph is in January. Regardless, it appears Luke will be much more alive, active, and overall present, in the next movie, than he was in this one. Which wouldn’t be hard to accomplish. Lastly, we get another shot of the two them still standing there from above, and we’re out.

First thing you see next, is “Directed by J.J. Abrams.” This comes full circle to my original quibbles about the credits. Said credits look oddly like a lazy approximation of the original credits. A pale imitation is really what they are. And there’s something about that simple detail that really bothered me, and still does. I mean, seriously. You heard of “Harmy,” yet? The individual (or possibly a group of individuals) who generated the De-Specialized Editions of the Original Films; thereby removing all changes made by George to the 1997 Special Editions? You know who I mean. Based upon samples I’ve seen, that person(s) did a much better job simulating those original credits, in a clear attempt to get those Original films as close to the versions that were theatrically released (in ’77, ’80, & ‘83,) as possible. Much better job. And although I’m not saying it had to be perfect — I’m not nitpicking, trust me – the fact is: if you’ve seen the Original films enough times, you will notice the glaring difference, pretty quickly. Once the film is released on home video, compare those opening and closing credits of Force Awakens (a title I do not like, and will address shortly) with that of the Original three films. You will instantly notice a clear difference. Again, I’m not stating this to be nitpicky. I’m pointing out how fucking lazy a job they did on the new film’s credits.SW Closing CreditsYou don’t see that with the Prequels. I gotta give ‘em credit for that, if nothing else. That element of the Prequels, Lucasfilm handled fairly well. They generated credits that were at the very least an attempt to be faithful to the pre-established look of those credits. But these new credits just look cheap and superficial. And while I’m sure many people will laugh at me being bothered by something like that, the truth is — it’s a clue. A big one. If approximating that look was done in such a slipshod manner, how much respect do you think they really have for Star Wars, in general? It says a lot about their actual intentions, as opposed to the public’s perception of their intentions.

All right. So, I think I’ve made my point.

PART THIRD  A fair analysis by a fair-haired 6-year old; loaded cap pistol in hand

Star Wars: The Force Awakens has a plot that is “almost” literally the same as the original Star Wars. Secret Plans are the McGuffin. A farm boy (or girl, this time) on a desert planet. Han and Chewie aboard the Millennium Falcon spirits her away from her home, with Stormtroopers hot on their trail. There’s another bar with aliens. There’s a Death Star. Need I go on?

“This isn’t your father’s Star Wars.” That was the comment I saw on the internet that incensed me. That really bothers me. Because A) it’s not even close to being in the same league as the 1977 film, and B) it’s ripping off the original film, along with elements of Empire and Jedi — and doing a very poor job of it. This is a film with a budget reportedly north of $200Million. And maybe … just maybe, that’s part of the problem. A “Star Wars” film, needs to be a film with a more manageable budget, a spirited and inspired filmmaker, and a support group behind it that does not consist solely of Corporate Hollywood, in order to escape the dreaded by-the-numbers “Star Wars Rip-off” sensibility. Which is exactly what this feels like. One of those movies that simply rips-off Star Wars. Some associated with this new film have termed it, “an homage.” Proving they have no idea what the true nature of homage is, any more than they understand the Forces at work that made the original film work so damn well.

Luckily, everything in this movie goes by so fast, you don’t have much time to complain. And you do generally enjoy it. The film is a Class-A production, all the way. Disney made sure of that. But an hour later, it feels hollow, trumped up, like an interesting diversion from the actual Star Wars Universe, and worst of all, regardless of the money they spent on it, it feels cheap. This doesn’t feel like Star Wars on the big screen. AGAIN: It feels like Star Wars on Television. Or something worse. And it’s too easy. Really great movies are A LOT harder to make than this. And most people never stop and wonder why. It’s because it’s a lot harder to really get it RIGHT.

In truth, I have absolutely nothing against Star Wars being on Television.  Actually, Star Wars: Rebels is frankly the best thing that has been done with the franchise, since Star Wars (1977) and Empire Strikes Back (1980.)  But a production “intended” for Television is an entirely different animal, than a production intended to theatrical release; which is this case, has been promulgated as the heir apparent to the original film that started it all, and isn’t even trying to get honor the sources of inspiration for the original film.

In Thesis, just because you are terrified of repeating the mistake that was the Prequels, doesn’t mean that you go to the opposite extreme, essentially using every sleazy, derivative tactic ever employed in the annals of Television, to rip-off your most cherished predecessor. No. You do the work, and you do it right.

In closing, I really hope the kids enjoyed it. But based upon recent statistics of the average age of ticket buyers for the film, either the kids are simply not interested in this film, or they didn’t feel they were invited. Which is sad. Because Star Wars should be for the kids. It should always be for the kids. And if they don’t feel welcome. Something has gone terribly wrong. In fact, that 6-year-old kid still inside of me did not feel welcome at all. Maybe it will play better on Television. Where it belongs.

Good move not killing Finn, by the way.

Good article at Hollywood Reporter website on why the Star Wars franchise has to pay off for Disney: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/how-star-wars-will-change-846918?facebook_20151212